Vintage Record Value


Auction: ROLLING STONES Out Of Our Heads LP UK 1965 MONO Nr MINT

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Title ROLLING STONES Out Of Our Heads LP UK 1965 MONO Nr MINT
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Price USD 896.74
ROLLING STONES Out Of Our Heads LP UK 1965 MONO Nr MINT, thumbnail_release115_260960729736.jpg

Auction Description

  If I was the sun way up there,  I’d go with my love everywhere, I’ll be the moon when the sun goes down, To let you know I’m still around, That’s how strong my love is, That’s how strong my love is. I’ll be the weeping willow drowning in my tears, You can go swimming when you’re here. I’ll be the rainbow when the sun is gone, Wrap you in my colours and keep you warm, That’s how strong my love is, That’s how strong my love is. I’ll be the ocean so deep and wide, I’ll dry the tears when you cry, I’ll be the breeze when the storm is gone, To dry your eyes, and keep you warm, That’s how strong my love is, That’s how strong my love is, Baby, that’s how strong my love is. That’s how strong my love is, That’s how strong my love is, So deep and so wide, my love is. Yes, it is so strong, can’t get over it, Is so wide you can’t get around me, That’s how strong my love is. That’s how strong my love is, yeah.

          

ROLLING STONES~"Out Of Our Heads" LP ORIGINAL 1965 UK PRESSING IN MONO, ISSUED 24th SEPTEMBER 1965. This was a Mono only album, a stereo mix was never made, the so called 'Stereo' UK version was electronically faked to create  a terrible sound, delayed echo effects were due to the mono version being placed into the two stereo channels with a fractional  delay.  The 1970's boxed logo stereo albums are exactly the same, the 'stereo' versions are possibly of interest to completeists but as most sellers either never declare the awful sound or simply cannot tell mono from stereo.  Buyers should be informed they are wasting money, there are too many incredible sounding mono and stereo 1960's Rolling Stones records to get involved with them. "Aftermath" was the first true stereo Rolling Stones album in 1966 and as crazy as that is, the first three Stones LP's were only mixed in mono, only a couple of tracks from all three albums are available in stereo today and they were re-recorded anyway. That also applies to any country in the world including America, if Master Tapes only exist in mono, stereo cannot be produced. 'Unboxed' LOGO RED DECCA LABEL: LK 4733. MAITRIX: ARL 6973 - 12A / ARL  6974 - 8B IN THE RUN-OUT GROOVES AT 9 0'CLOCK THE 'MOTHER' DIGITS ARE '1' & '2', A FIRST PRESSINGb BUT WITH  DECCA'S DELIBERATE QUICK SUCCESSION OF END DIGIT RISES RISES, I HAVE NAMED THIS AS ORIGINAL TO 1965.  I WILL EXPLAIN BELOW WHY "Out Of Our Heads" WAS UNIQUE FOR THAT IN THE MAIN DESCRIPTION. ORIGINAL 1965 DECCA POLY-LINED INNER SLEEVE IN BARELY USED, UNWORN, UNCREASED AND UNSPLIT. The last of this design with just two record care sections positioned on the front right side, "Handling" instructions are above the die-cut centre and "Playing" instructions below it.  Few were printed with an encoded date of manufacturing, this sleeve was;    '055' = 'May 1965'    In this half of the decade the '1960' part was considered too obvious to print, like CBS, Phillips & Polydor, Decca's unique  Patented designed inner sleeves had the decade signified with just the zero of '1960.'  Then the year followed by the month, to  arrive at May 1965.  As I have found in the past, with albums selling as many copies as singles now in the 60's, huge volumes  were printed well in advance of accomodate big selling albums like this, this was made 12 weeks before the release date.  WITH ONLY A RECORD IMPRESSION AND MODERATE AGEING, IN EXCELLENT+++/ NEAR MINT CONDITION.    SEPTEMBER 1965, 'Robert Stace' PRINTED  FIRST ISSUE MONO COVER, UNIQUELY SHAPED WITH THE SPINE  ENDINGS TAPERED TO POINTS AND THE MAIN SECTION FLAT.  THAT CREATED A BOWED OR SLOPING SHAPE  ON THE TOP & BOTTOM SECTIONS OF THE FRONT.  PLEASING TO THE EYE AND WITH DECCA'S RIDICULOUSLY  SMALL 60's COVERS, ONLY FRACTIONALLY BIGGER THAN THE RECORD'S CIRCUMFERANCE, A SHAPE THAT  ASSISTED THE REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT OF THE LP IN SUCH UNNECESSARY CONFINED SPACE.  This still has that shape due to such amazingly low plays of the record but even that was unable to prevent a degree of ageing  and typical storage traits of all the Stones' 1964 - 1969 covers.  Excluding of course their four gatefold covers that were made  at least 100% stronger and also larger, apart from the "Through The Past Darkly" hexagonal gatefold cover. The earlier the single covers, the more allowances have to be made for them holding massively heavyweight records, especially "Out Of Our Heads" because it was the first Stones album made without laminated flipback edges options. Only some of the 1964 first two albums had them and they provided superb protection to the bottom standing edges.   I do not look to excuses for condition but I always give honest and critical overviews of designs and materials used, compare Decca's covers to EMI's and the difference was significant,  60's covers in general took quite a battering in the initial first years in that decade alone.  Mind you, compared to unlaminated matt 1970's 'Rolling Stones Records' album covers, Decca's were actually deluxe quality! "Out Of Our Heads" is notorious for having a severely battered badly worn cover, this has minimal wear which only concerns the pressuring of the pointed endings of the spine, the rest is purely about standing in storage for the last 47 years.  The front's thick deluxe laminate is deeply glossy and totally undulled from the usual heavy handling, still with a rigid solid feel.  Something I often decribe as 'starchy' due to abused covers becoming frail, limp and severely creased from constant removal and replacement of the record.  The front's brilliant artwork is a Gerald Mankowitz photo in wonderful mid-60's tones of black and grey, no white was left on the tinted photo, including the lettering of the album's titles, unusually placed into the bottom left hand corner, 60's  psychedelic colourswere not that far off, but in 1965 this was an unconventional and radical portrayal of the Stones, creating a very small 45 degrees laminate wrinkle across the bottom left corner.  Not a crease because the corresponding position on the back is perfectly flat,hard to see in a picture with the dark background, then it's only 3/4 inch or 2 cms and there are no other laminate creases on the entire front, including even in the contours of the record's internal position.  Exceptionally rare for this cover not to have pronounced creases and they normally affected the back as well, needless to say this has an uncreased back panel.   All to add to the front is some reasonable ageing to thin white bordee and the ridged spine edge, mostly the tips of the pointed endings or left side corners.  The two right side corners are remarkably still an unrounded, perfect 90 degress or square shaped, the bottom corner is absolutely perfect, top right only has the merest hint of rubbing but far too minor to count. The ridged spine created a recess for the laminate to wrap round, a common enough position where the laminate was not smoothed into, there is only a small area right down near the bottom part of the meeting point where the laminate was not stuck down, it is perfectly strong there and so clealy transparent, you can see the sheer clarity of the lamination even on such a small area.  Just one iten left to mention, the ever present tiny edge laminate lines, none at all on the top and bottom edges and only a few on the  spine side of the front. The top and bottom edges and the opening sides are in remarkable condition, even the standing bottom edge has unworn laminate and that is another weak position on most 1965 first edition covers, but not on this cover.  I mentioned the top & bottom spine tips having standing pressure and light wear, the main section has perfectly clear album titles, catalogue number and 'mono', a positive ageing to the white background but this is nearly half a century old!   The LP title was printed on the tapering/pointed tip's top section, half the lettering is only seen from the back view as a consequence, I did my best with the close up picture to show as much as side view permits, I can assure you all the lettering and digits are 100% present, correct and perfectly clear. Just a few ripples in an otherwise exceptional spine, allowing for tome ageing of course, my pictures will tell their own story about the overall condition. The back panel is normally a major problem area on an original 1965 cover, with severe yellowing, stains, scuffs rips & tears and out of control ring wear.  Not here, this is in superbly unscuffed, unworn condition and apart from some expected ageing to the white border, this survived in outstanding condition, in fact, the white border is on the edges and the glue soaked into the highly absorbant matt paper.  Once again I do not make excuses, all the white sections of the text, logo's and picture are still the original 1965 pure white colour, please refer to my picture of the back for confirmation of a fantastic, perfect back  panel, they will all show such focused concentration on tiny details detract from a superb cover. THE COVER IS IN EXCELLENT++ CONDITION. THE IMMACULATE LABELS HAVE PERFECT PRINTING AND SPINDLE ALIGNMENTS SHOW ONLY 4 / 5  PLAYS, WHICH   FOR A 1965 ROLLING STONES ALBUM, IS INCREDIBLY LOW.  THE RECORD HAS THE DEEPLY GLOSSY APPEARANCE  OF JUST PRESSED VINYL, WITHOUT THE ALMOST OBLIGITORY MAZE OF SCRATCHES AND MARKS, HANDLING TRACES  ARE FEW AND FEATHER LIGHT TO NEAR NEAR INVISIBLE.   THE SOUND QUALITY BLEW ME CLEAN AWAY!  THE AUDIO  CLARITY WAS ASTONISHING, NOT A SINGLE CRACKLE OR CLICK TO BE HEARD ON ANY OF THE TWELVE TRACKS OR IN  THE TRACK'S GAPS.   THE RECORD IS IN NEAR MINT CONDITION.

  

  SIDE 1 "She Said Yeah" (Sonny Bono / Roddy Jackson) "Mercy, Mercy" (Don Covay / Ronnie Miller) "Hitch Hike" (Marvin Gaye / Clarence Paul / Mickey Stevenson) "That's How Strong My Love Is" (Roosevelt Jamison) "Good Times" (Sam Cooke) "Gotta Get Away" (Mick Jagger / Keith Richards) SIDE 2 "Talkin' 'Bout You"  (Chuck Berry) "Cry To Me" (Bert Russell) "Oh Baby (We Got a Good Thing Goin')" (Barbara Lynn Ozen) "Heart of Stone" (Mick Jagger / Keith Richards) "The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man" ( (Nanker Phelge - Rolling Stones) "I'm Free" (Mick Jagger / Keith Richards) Mick Jagger - vocals, harmonica & tambourine Brian Jones - acoustic & electric guitar,  harmonica & tambourine Keith Richards - acoustic & electric guitar & backing vocals Charlie Watts - drums Bill Wyman - bass guitar & backing vocals Jack Nitzsche - electric guitar, piano, organ, harpsichord, keyboards & percussion  Phil Spector - bass  Ian Stewart - piano, organ & percussion    Recorded Entirely In America;  10th & 11th May 1965, At Chess Studios, Chicago.  12th & 13th May 1965, At RCA Studios, Hollywood.  Produced By Andrew Loog Oldham.

          

I had better get straight to the pressing details,"Out Of Our Heads" was the third UK Rolling Stones album and like everything  they released, it became a major selling album.  Issued the 24th September 1965, it reached No.2 and spent 20 weeks in the UK  charts, the only obstacle to hitting No.1 was the Beatles "Help!", issued two months previously in August, but with the film that  was unmovable by any artist.  The Beatles and the Rolling Stones were the hottest properties on the planet and their respective  record companies were ready, willing and able to produce the mountain of vinyl and associated printed items... before the release  dates.  For example, "Help!" was a No.1 album before it even reached the record shops, advance orders alone saw to that and the   Stones were one of the few bands who could live with the Beatles for record sales in 1965.  The days of singles out-selling LP's   were dead and buried, the advance orders for "Help!"were so colossal, some of the chart returns and music papers had the album  entering the singles chart as well, at No.19.  I still have my copy of "New Musical Express" from August 1965, the front page has   a promo for the "Help!" LP and single on the week of release and there in the charts, is the single at No.1, the album at No.19 and   the LP topping the album charts. The unbelievable volume of records required for that meant great planning to produce so many just  to handle the initial first few weeks, bearing in mind EMI & Decca had untold other big selling artists singles EP's and albums to  press, as well for the mere mortals. "Out Of Our Heads" required five months of solid, continuous sales, multiple pressings were required, especially when many originals were sold just before or during the traditionally busiest time for record buying, the Christmas period.  I had better stick with the release in last week of September, once again the advance orders were enormous  because on the 1st October, "Out Of Our Heads" was in the No.2 position, Decca anticipated that and as was their custom, they  were now pressing very small batches at a time, like EMI, an new habit brought about by singles in this period often out-selling   albums. In terms of indexing them all, this time they went to the most extreme measures ever seen in the 1960's decade, even the   Beatles LP's had not been given such attention to numerical stampings, even though their albums were in the charts on average for  a whole year around this very busy 1965.  It was never repeated by Decca again but out of all the Rolling Stones 1960's UK LP's,  "Out Of Our Heads" had the highest rise for the maitrix number's end digits, following a very strictly maintained pressing sequence.   This record's end digits may look excessivly high but this is positively an original pressing to the pre- September 1965 release, please see my picture of the inner sleeve's encoded date, a look round ebay will confirm how much higher they ended up!  I do not like starting  a description by concentrating on pressing details, the music in the grooves of a record is far more important, but "Out Of Our Heads" is completely different to any other album in the 60's and important enough to deal with pressing sequences here and now.  I will just put that into perspective, this record's '-12A /-8B' maitrix end digits belong to a 47 year old record that has barely been played and has stunning sound quality.  In relationship to Decca's pressing sequence, the fact  this is in such stunning condition makes a colosal difference, but the audio standard in 1965 was totally dependent on the meticulously changing of the mothers/ metal stamping discs.  They were obviously pre-prepared before the pressing stage even began an order to prevent the predictable wear to them from producing records with audible sound flaws.  The stamping disc or a 'mother' was exactly like anegative photographs were used to print from before today's digital cameras, they were made from very soft metal  which deteriorated, so they were changed well before they started to wear.  In the same way a record sstylus should not be left until the sound becomes poor, you must change them well in advance or long term damage is caused.  Decca displayed great concern for the audio standards by producing those smaller batches, if you read their instructions on the inner sleeve of this record, there is that genuine concern about replacing worn needles and even how to hold records.  However, their 'over the top' indexing does need explaining today, for example EMI were also doing exatly the same but  kept their digits very low but supervised like a military operation.  For example, "Sgt. Pepper"sold a mind boggling 4 million copies in the first four weeks of issue, in 1967 EMI managed to press every single one with perfect sound without raising end digits, but they most certainly changed the 'mother's as often as Decca.  I am not suggesting "Out Of Our Heads" sold four million copies in the first few weeks, but positively enough to reach this record's maitrix. Now I can return to the importance of a record's condition, a mono 1965 Rolling Stones LP would have been played so many times, counting them from the labels cannot be done, we are into the region of hundreds in just the first few weeks of purchase alone.  Then there are another 42 year to be accounted for, the labels' worn white circle of sub level backing paper around the centre holes tell of countless plays wnyway, often seen graded as Excellent and even Near Mint on ebay! Unbelievable, such ignorance borders deliberate lies and either way, an insult to buyer's intelligence.  1965 or not, this is not an average condition record, it had so few plays, they are easy to count from these matt red labels, only four to five times, which for this album is a major  rarity.   Compared to the average condition mono records, this has only barely been played and the sound reproduction reflects that, just awesome!  Well cared for and hardly played 1960's records generally will have a top condition cover, with anything to be viewed as just how it has naturally formed over the decades, only constant use and handling caused the severe wear common to "Out Of Our Heads," I know I have said it above but in reality this cover is in superb condition. During our long time trading at UK Record Fairs, I became irritated by hearing Stones collector's saying how poor the sound was on the first three Stones LP's and in particular, "Out Of Our Heads".   I agreed completely about the suppossed 'stereo' LP, re-processed mono to fake stereo, but the mono record was mastered and pressed with the most perfect audio properties you could wish to hear.   I will quickly add something I constantly point out to counteract regularly seeing sub-standard condition records being sold, using those digits to  insinuate the sound will be better than a record with higher maitrix digits.  Regulars to vinyl know, a worn record is.... a worn out record, stamped letters and digits cannot not produce a note of music, music signals deep down in the grooves are the vital part of original viny.  Grading records concerns use and any damage inflicted, bringing me back to the first three Stones albums, forming an opinion from excessively played, worn out and damaged mono records, happens because that is the average condition. Playing an original UK pressing in near perfect condition (Near Mint) is the  only way to judge any record, the first three mono only Rolling Stones LP's from unworn grooves, will be immaculately recorded, mixed, mastered and pressed records.  This is not only way, way above the average condition, the few plays in the mid-1960's were made with a perfect needle, preserving the superb mono sound, a sound I've known for 47 years now and of the multiple copies I have heard since 1965, few have measured up to the true potential of original pressings.  It's not ego, just my love of the album that makes me proud to say I have only ever sold "Out Of Our Heads" exactly as it should be heard.   That sound has a razor sharp edge to it, the unbelievable power of the UK mono mix should impact extremely loudly, but totally undistorted on the very highest pitched notes, particularly for the bass guitar and the harmonica.  This record is up there with the very best I have heard, because I have the one audio standard, this becomes only the third copy I have offered on ebay, I will not compromise those standards.  This record is even virtually without any static, enough talking, time for some magnificent music from the original line up of the  Rolling Stones.  What a relief to discuss music and not pressing plants, most of the tracks are the r&bclassics the Stones were inspired by, in this 1965 period they were still developing their songwriting ability, to have just written "Satisfaction" was a massive step on the way to greatness, although that tsingle was not included on the UK album.  Just three original Jagger/Richards compositions and in thefollowing year Mick and Keith would make amazing progress, by writing the whole of their next album, "Aftermath".   "Out Of Our Heads" was recorded in the home of the Stones' blues influence, in Chicago and Hollywood studios, a very special album bridging their earliest era and placing them on the threshold of continuing a superb run of  1960's albums and singles. Side 1 has near enough silent grooves, opening up the album with an electrifying performance of a tremendous Sonny Bono and Roddy Jackson r&b composition,"She Said Yeah." The intro is just a single electric guitar, usually ruined by crackles and clicks but not here, incredibly clean and clear of eany surface sound, without any kind of needle noise and the the rest of the track can be enjoyed in ultra powerful mono sound. Stunningly sharp edged and crystal clear, the true sound of a mono "Out Of Our Heads," Mick Jagger's vocals and the instruments are superbly defined, an exceptionally powerful bass guitar sound from Bill, the cause of sound defects on plain worn out damaged vinyl.  The 'muddy' distorting records were not how Decca pressed them, the long years of constant heavy playing caused that and as usual my volume is set to wall shaking, I was before, but even more so now, really impressed with that full on bass clarity.   Finishing into perfectly smooth running and silent linking grooves, another perfectly clean intro to "Mercy, Mercy".  Mick's vocals carry great conviction and a growing authorative delivery, heard in superbly clear audio definition, this record handles the bass guitar with consumate ease, "Mercy, Mercy" could be interpreted as a call to turn the bass down, it's that loud here!  The sheer energy of their performance tranfers to the format custom made for the hard edged blues, the extremely powerful mono sound isn't confined to just the bass guitar though, everything here was mastered at equal  volume and even for me, this  is being played extra loudly!  For anyone reading my descriptions for the first time, welcome, I always love to  hear my own records at full blast, for sound grading I play records deliberately at very high volume as that is  the only way I can be certain there is no form of distortion.  Full volume is really revealing for any surface sound as well and this record is completely clear of one of the main things I can't tolerate from music, sound degeneration.  From those wonderful silent linking grooves, an emphatic guitar riff inro for "Hitch Hike" is as perfectly clean as I will only ever accept and happily  repeat, there are no crackles, clicks, pops or even static on this Marvin Gaye, Clarence Paul & Mickey Stevenson classic of an   r&b song.  The abuse of the grading terminoligies has sadly reached epedemic proportions on ebay, I can assure anyone poised  to send an email for confirmation of such perfect sound reproduction, the audio is genuinely just stunning!  Charlie's tremendous  drumming is crisp and precise, the r&b rhythm was boosted by infectious handclaps and even they are in startling clarity, worn  records lose these finer points of recordings, usually such details have long ago disappeared into multiple crackles. Outstanding  sound on Brian and Keith's guitars, with the solo's individual notes ringing out in staggering clarity.  I have not played this album  for at least two years now and such fantastic sound quality makes this a joy to  hear again.  The next intro is essentially heard   without any needle noise, crackles or clicks and even though I did  check the whole of the album out thorougly this morning, I am  still keeping focused on the potential trouble spots. "That's How Strong My Love Is" starts from a totally silent gap, the gently  played intro is ultra clean for this wonderfully slow, burning r&b ballad, playing in amazingly powerful mono sound,  the sheer   clarity is awesome!  Mick Jagger's brilliant vocals sound so good ,the piano notes are also in a razor sharp detail, Bill Wyman's  bass guitar forms a solid block of sound, the drums are also a major part of the dramatic build up, above all, a magnificent Mick  Jagger vocal.  As I'm typing Mick's sing the ending ad-libbed section, I did not include all that in the lyrics at the top of the  page,what an immaculate pressing!  I've heard far too many original records distorting terribly on this much loved track, this  really is a genuine pleasure to hear "That's How Strong My Love Is" with the sound of Mint vinyl.  My grading is absurd for such  a perfect playing record, there is nothing remotely 'near' coming from my speakers, but visual signs of handling or playing must  always be incorperated into an honest grading.  I am hardly immune from Mint records,I have never seen a true Mint first pressing  or original since 1965 but I've heard many records that sound like one!  Fading out into a totally silent gap, the delicate sound  of the intro to "Good Times" are in perfectly clean, needle noise free sound, this is stunning mono   sound quality, even Keith's  lower level backing vocals, are just as clear as Mick's nicely laid backy sung lead vocals. An outstanding mono mix, with every   part of the track so crystal clear, individual instruments are in pin-point clarity.   The Stones had become masters of covering  these great USA classics, Sam Cooke's "Good Times" was a perfect vehicle for the Stones, but the last track on this side is the   first of the original compositions.  From perfectly smooth running, silent linking grooves, the very quietly played intro to the great "Gotta Get Away" is without anny form of surface sound at all.  A superb melody and this is very similar in feel and tempo   to the previous track, "Good Times".  Once again, from the cleanest intro you could hope to hear, continuing the audio perfection throughout the whole song.  The slower, easy going tempo of this track still contains the full weight  of the powerful mono mix, so there's no need to turn the volume up on these slower and more subdued recordings.  Bill's remarkable bass guitar remains at full volume as ever, and another majestic Mick Jagger vocal to end a side packed with towering  performances.    Side 2 begins from near silent/ silent run-in grooves, permitting a silent entrance for the definitive Chuck Berry composition, "Talkin' 'Bout You." Just about the finest r&b for the Stones to record  in the USA, with an outstanding vocal from Mick, by 1965 he had developed the swagger of a natural lead vocalist able to improvise, something we came to know so well over the coming decades. The sound of the guitar solo is just astonishing, no question this sharpness being the very sound of a Mint record, only having those few plays back in 1965 can be both seen and most importantly....heard!  I am of course listening extremely carefully behind the music as much on these rock tracks as the slow blues performances, there is still no surface sound. Just to re-enforce that "Talkin' 'Bout You" has a gradually faded-out ending, as the sound finally dies away there's not a crackle or surface sound to be heard, just a superbly clean intro for the seering slow r&b/blues rendition of, "Cry To Me".  Mick Jagger's phrasing and his ad-libbing was so natural, in fact, the more you hear this third album,"Out Of Our Heads," if I remember correctly it was their fourth in America, the more you appreciate what a major turning point the 1965 recordings were for the Rolling Stones. They had reached the point where they had become so great on blues/r&b cover versions, either they spent the rest of their career relying onother songwriters, or they went beyond just writing their own singles, into composing the complete album of original material.   For now it's so good to enjoy their peaking in making these inspirational USA classics their own, next in line for a Rolling Stones version is Barbara Ozen's,"Oh Baby (We Got A Good Thing Going)."  Played with all the authority of a band with full confidence in each other's musical ability, producing the magical chemistry of the live performances in recording studios, seperated them from average r&b / blues groups, who were still coming thick and fast in 1965. The guitars from Brian and Keith are in pristine sound quality, a nice bit of Chuck Berry style playing, after the second verse Mick sings,"We gotta good thing going," the band stop playing there and the next piece before a flurry of guitars, in that split second there's total silence from the record as well. During the rest of this track there is still no surface sound, as for any needle noise, it simply does not exist on this record! Which is so vital for the second of Mick and Keith's compositions,"Heart Of Stone", a slow blues song with a minimal production so a track very  prone to needle noise, but not here.  The intro is perfection for only hearing the guitar, bass and drums, then into  the most stunning audio on the rest of this brilliant song, this was one of the tracks that was re-recorded in true stereo. I also mentioned"Satisfaction" was not on the UK album and allowing for that amazing single, "Heart Of Stone" was the most major song Mick & Keith had written to date.  The band's performance of this real pot boiler of smouldering r&Bb, is among their very best from any era. Mick sings this one way down low, building up dramatic tension until it is released on a superb ad-libbed last verse. It's repetetive suff but I must say how perfect the sound is, then for pure blues the next track is far more in line with the songs on their first two albums.  "The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man" has all the blues element that made their earliest recordings so rivetting to listen to, including all the non-LP Bsides that sadly so few get to hear, well, keep an eye on my listings of Stones singles, only when I can present them in Near Mint / Mint though.    Outstanding blues harmonica with great drumming from Charlie, a very nicely understated Mick Jagger vocal, a blues piano and Bill's rock solid.   Just one thing I neglected to add to that list, a perfectly clean clear intro and outro, the toughest of all, but this record has them to perfection.  The LP ends with "I'm Free", for the final report on the track's gaps, it's a pleasure to say they run as smooth as silk for the third Jagger / Richards composition, and what a great one this is!   Even to the final song after a perfectly clear, clean intro to an r&b song with a superb melody, in simply stunning sound!  The drum breaks have those typical Charlie Watts 'thudding' sounds, as heard on those classic 1965 Stones singles, including of course the current "Satisfaction." The realism of the guitar sound on the solo is just incredible, the final guitar notet fades away right at the end, naturally enough without any  needle noise or even static.  An incredible playing record without anything to spoil absolutely trouble free listening pleasure. A very highly recommended original "Out Of Our Heads". {Roy}

 

R & M RECORDS. My lifetime's love of music and records began at a very young age, the arrival of the Beatles and the 1960's decade  in general had a very profound effect. It was only natural to bring all my first hand experience of collecting vinyl  into becoming a professional record seller.  Over twenty years ago now we entered into the wonderful atmosphere of record fairs with the highest possible standards set. When the Internet became the world's new market place for  vinyl, in 2001 it was time to join ebay. Those standards were rigidly adhered to as they will always continue to be, the basics of honesty and integrity were very much part of the era the music I love originated in, so here is our friendly and very efficient service we are proud to provide; EVERY RECORD IS FULLY PLAYED AND COMES WITH A 'NO ARGUMENT' MONEY BACK GUARANTEE.   I USE GOOD OLD COMMON SENSE AS WELL AS A GLOBALLY ACCEPTED GRADING TERMINOLOGY  FROM THE U.K. "RECORD COLLECTOR PRICE GUIDE" BOOK. THERE IT CLEARLY STATES "Sound Quality" AFFECTS EVERY GRADING LEVEL AND THAT IS THE ONE AND ONLY POSSIBLE WAY TO ACCURATELY GRADE RECORDS. i.e. COMBINING A STRICT VISUAL INSPECTION WITH VERY CLOSELY LISTENING TO EVERY SECOND, UNLESS PERHAPS IN THE CASE OF GENUINELY UNPLAYED VINYL.  EVEN THEN WE STILL TAKE FULL RESPONSIBITY FOR A RECORD WHEN A CUSTOMER RECEIVES EITHER A SEALED OR AN UNPLAYED RECORD.  MY DESCRIPTIONS WILL ALWAYS BE 100% HONEST AND TOTALLY ACCURATE ON ALL GRADINGS FROM 'V.G.' ( VERY GOOD), TO THE ULTIMATE 'MINT' CONDITION. ANY QUESTIONS ON OUR ITEMS ARE WELCOMED AND WILL BE PROMPTLY REPLIED TO.  WE ARE FULLY EXPERIENCED AT SHIPPING WORLDWIDE AND NO EFFORT IS SPARED TO PROTECT RECORDS AND COVERS ETC.  WE WELCOME BIDDERS FROM ANY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD. ALL RECORDS ARE REMOVED FROM THEIR SLEEVES AND PLACED INTO NEW PROTECTIVE CARD SLEEVES AND THEN PLACED INTO NEW, HEAVYWEIGHT PLASTIC OUTER SLEEVES. THE GREATEST ATTENTION IS PAID TO MAKING THE PACKAGING EXTREMELY STRONG & SECURE. EVERY POSSIBLE EFFORT IS MADE TO ENSURE A SAFE DELIVERY AND WE ONLY USE THE VERY BEST QUALITY PACKAGING MATERIALS, THE COST OF THE ITEM IS IMMATERIAL, EVERY RECORD IS TREATED  EXACTLY THE SAME. WE DO NOT TREAT POSTAGE AS A MONEY MAKING PROJECT, POSTAGE IS LESS THAN COST, USING ONLY PROFESSIONALLY PACKED BOXES WITH SUBSTANTIAL PROTECTIVE PACKAGING THAT DOES WEIGH A LITTLE EXTRA. UNDER PAYPAL & EBAY'S GUIDELINES, ALL RECORDS WILL BE SENT VIA A FULLY INSURED TRACKABLE SERVICE. IN THE UK RECORDS UP TO THE VALUE OF £41 WILL BE SENT RECORDED DELIVERY, OVER £41 WILL BE SENT SPECIAL DELIVERY.   FOR THE REST OF THE WORLD ALL RECORDS WILL BE SENT VIA 'INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR.'

POSTAGE  COST FOR LP's UK: UP TO VALUE OF £41, FIRST CLASS RECORDED DELIVERY  £5.00 UK: OVER VALUE OF £41, FULLY INSURED SPECIAL DELIVERY £8.00 EUROPE: FULLY INSURED VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR  £12.00 USA,JAPAN & REST OF THE WORLD FULLY INSURED VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £18.00 POSTAGE COST FOR EP's & 7" UK: UP TO THE VALUE OF £41 FIRST CLASS RECORDED DELIVERY £2.50 UK: OVER THE VALUE OF £41 FULLY INSURED SPECIAL DELIVERY £5.50 EUROPE: AIR MAIL VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £8.00 USA, JAPAN ETC. AIRMAIL VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £9.00

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statistics for auctions of this release
Release Name Out Of Our Heads
Catalogue LK 4733
Sold auctions 227
Running auctions 5
Maximum paid $896.74
Minimum paid $1.59
Average paid $64.49
Popularity 48% of all auctions for this release were sold.